Monday, 14 June 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 181 OF 230

Poem 181 of 230:  NEXT TIME - AUTUMN 2001

Via the Metro
    And some leafy roads,
I found, at Jarrow,
    One of Bede’s abodes.

At the Bede’s World shop,
    I browsed and I bought,
But I did not stop -
    “I’ll come back,” I thought.

For, from the farmyard
    (Set as of Bede’s day),
Sadly, folks were barred -
    Foot-and-mouth still lay.

Heading home for grub,
    With goals not yet made,
I noticed a pub -
    The Jarrow Crusade.

(C) David Franks 2003


Sunday, 13 June 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 182 OF 230

Poem 182 of 230:  WALLSEND - AUTUMN 2001

Paying the canny post-six-thirty fare,
    I took the Metro out to old Wallsend.
The gates were closed when I got there,
    But I scanned Segedunum, end to end;
Then raised my eyes to the colourful jibs,
    Which - I heard on the following day’s news -
Are soon, again, to be used building ships,
    Thereby lowering our job-search queues.

(C) David Franks 2003





Saturday, 12 June 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 183 OF 230

Poem 183 of 230:  A BROWN HARE - AUTUMN 2001

Cramlington:
    Before an
Interview
    At a new
Factory,
    I did see,
By a stream
    In-between
Farm and home,
    On a roam,
Stopping there,
    A brown hare.

(C) David Franks 2003

Friday, 11 June 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 184 OF 230

Poem 184 of 230:  THE QUICK CLUBBERS’ TROT IN NEWCASTLE - AUTUMN 2001

Fridays, Saturdays,
    Latish in the night,
Bringing a smile,
    Making quite a sight
Down the steep-sloped Side,
    High on their heels -
Bonny blithe ladies,
    Done with their meals
Or earlier clubs,
    Seeking the next spot,
And risking it with
    Their quick clubbers’ trot.

(C) David Franks 2003




Thursday, 10 June 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 185 OF 230

Poem 185 of 230:  ON A SATURDAY - AUTUMN 2001

A seat for a play, well-done,
    At the People’s Theatre;
A walk home through the club-fun -
    But still without a partner;
Memorised “Jerusalem” -
    Lines long-sung as spirit-spur.

(C) David Franks 2003

Wednesday, 9 June 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 186 OF 230

Poem 186 of 230:  W.W.T. WASHINGTON - AUTUMN 2001

Arriving, took tea
    With beans on dry toast -
Sitting down to see
    What large ponds can host.

From this collection,
    I walked out to the
Wildlife section -
    More the place for me.

There are many hides;
    Plus feed through the cold -
On one of the sides,
    Woodpeckers took hold.

And, as I moved on,
    Beside the Wear,
A calm grey-heron -
    Willing fish near.

(C) David Franks 2003



This grey-heron in Hyde Park, London;
April 2016

Tuesday, 8 June 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 187 OF 230

Poem 187 of 230:  A SOUTH SHIELDS WALKABOUT - AUTUMN 2001

Out of the museum-and-gallery
    (Wiser on Cookson and the local way),
Down Ocean Road with, to the right of me,
    Its eateries and, left, neat places to stay;
Before, on either side, Marine Parks -
    The southern-one a most beautiful place,
Teeming with moorhens, swans, grebes and mallards,
    In a small lake at a scenic-hill’s base.

Then (holding chips from the parade’s cafe
    And, thus, a flock of gulls squawking above)
Onto the South Pier I made my way:
    Seeing seaweed over rocks - like a glove -
And high-and-dry sands, held - from transgression -
    By growth of grass and the weaving of wood,
Plus, in the dim light of a sleepy sun,
    Fishing boats returning to Tynemouth’s hood.

(C) David Franks 2003








Monday, 7 June 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 188 OF 230

Poem 188 of 230:  REMEMBER, REMEMBER - AUTUMN 2001

From afar, blow-lights,
    Followed by speed’s pause, before
Fireworks' blow-sounds.

(C) David Franks 2003



Sunday, 6 June 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 189 OF 230

Poem 189 of 230:  TO SEE AN UNCLE, AGAIN - WINTER 2001/2

Leaving the broad scenes of England’s North East,
    From corner to corner, by bus journeys,
For the beautiful tight-hedge boundaries,
    And mazy lanes, that herald the South West.

(C) David Franks 2003

Saturday, 5 June 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 190 OF 230

Poem 190 of 230:  BIRDWATCHERS’ BUDE - WINTER 2001/2

Behind the Tourist Centre,
    Between canal and river,
On the marshy drained-floodplain
    (Not now visited by train),
In among willow and reed,
    Eking out some winter feed:
Treecreepers, bobbing robins,
    Chirpy blue-tits, grey-heron,
The screams of water-rail,
    And snipe sharp on their trail.
Plus, out along sandstone down,
    Soaring seabirds can be found.

(C) David Franks 2003