Tuesday, 14 September 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 151 OF 230

Poem 151 of 230:  A TIME AND A PLACE

                           Archaeologists
(The show’s name I’ll dodge)
Squabbling like seagulls
(Most passionately),
             And running around -
Past-site or schoolyard?

             The popular way
(In England, by far),
           But children suffer
For such huff and puff.

(C) David Franks 2003

Monday, 13 September 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 152 OF 230

Poem 152 of 230:  HISTORY IS A FOREIGN COUNTRY?

History is a foreign country?
    Reading Chaucer’s ‘Tales one can see -
In brilliant witty prosody -
    A definite continuity
In the matters of humanity.
    So how, then, could one fail to be
Without respect for one’s history?

As we can learn from other cultures,
So, too, from our own through its years.

(C) David Franks 2003

Sunday, 12 September 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 153 OF 230

Poem 153 of 230:  WISE?

  I
Like fair competition,
                           Which
Requires regulation;
                              A
Large facility
                     Is
Regulated better
                  When
Nationalised…
              Wise?

(C) David Franks 2003

Saturday, 11 September 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 154 OF 230

Poem 154 of 230:  GETTING TO KNOW GOD

God lets us go
    Our own way -
Until the Day;
    Now and then, though,
He has a Say
    In His own Way -
Prophets to Sow,
    Deserts to Pay.

(C) David Franks 2003

Friday, 10 September 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 155 OF 230

part four
FURTHER NORTH
(travels)

Poem 155 of 230:  FURTHER PICTURES

Photographs and, more so, painted-
    Pictures of people and places,
For ends, involve in some cases
    Adjustment of what was gathered.

With restrained creative licence
    (To make rhyme and metre with sense),
The further matters in here
    Did happen to me, no fear.

(C) David Franks 2003

Thursday, 9 September 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 156 OF 230

Poem 156 of 230:  EASTBOURNE - SUMMER 2001

On the day before the solstice,
    I first sighted Eastbourne:
A beautiful elegant place -
    English culture untorn.

Two long-days allowed two long-lanes
    To be walked before dark -
One after travel on four trains,
    One post-Devonshire Park.

The first was between sea and heath,
    Plus gardens signed by post,
Then up the Downs to view, beneath,
    The brutal handsome coast.

The next, contrasting that before,
    Showed all kinds of vessels -
Parked up along the pebbly shore
    And in marina cells.

(But, as for the women’s tennis,
    It soon became a qualm -
As I was put-off by what is
    A great strain on the arm.)

(C) David Franks 2003












Wednesday, 8 September 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 157 OF 230

Poem 157 of 230:  THE MANY ELEMENTS OF BUXTON - SUMMER 2001

From famous Blue John,
The list goes on:

Mineral water,
    Foliage-dressed wells,
Green-grass on the Slopes,
    Limestone dales,
Clay-tiled arcades,
    Plain-glass awnings,
Shaped-iron columns,
    Stained-glass ceilings,
Earthen garden-urns,
    Wooden inlays,
Soil in a cross,
    Pebble pathways,
And, had between walks,
    Combating the
Weather element,
    Plenty of tea!

(C) David Franks 2003

Saint Anne's Well, Buxton; 15/7/17

Hope to return for this...Buxton; 15/7/17

The Slopes, Buxton; 15/7/2017

Add caption

Awning beside Buxton's Quadrant; 15/7/17

Bandstand at Pavilion Gardens, Buxton; 15/7/17

Urn beside River Wye, Buxton; 15/7/17

Wooden inlays, Devonshire Dome, Buxton; 15/7/17

Devonshire Dome, Buxton; 15/7/2017

The Tea Chest, Buxton; 15/7/2017

Tea Chest, Buxton; 15/7/17

Tuesday, 7 September 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 158 OF 230

Poem 158 of 230:  LYTHAM AND ST. ANNE’S - SUMMER 2001

On bus-line 7,
    From Blackpool’s station:
The homes of St. Anne’s -
    Wide, like her shore’s sands;
Lytham’s seaside green;
    And that course between.

(C) David Franks 2003

Monday, 6 September 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 159 OF 230

Poem 159 of 230:  WINDERMERE - SUMMER 2001

(Tune:

C2 F3 G2 F3 D1 F3 D2 C1 C3
B2 G3 F2 A1 G3 B2 C’1 C’3
C2 F3 G2 F3 D1 F3 D2 C1 C3
B2 G3 F2 A1 G3 B2 C’1 C’3

C2 F2 B2 E’2
E’1 D’1 C’1 B1 A1 G1 F3
C2 F2 B2 E’2
E’1 D’1 C’1 B1 A1 G1 F3)
 
Some thirteen years from my first visit
    (Then, dropped from hitching, just near;
This time, by train and a downhill walk),
    I arrived at Windermere:

A Wainwright-like
Windermere walkabout;
A Wordsworth-like
Windermere walkabout.

On the ferry Miss Cumbria Three,
    A chill-out trip to Ambleside -
Viewing the trees, the farms, the fells,
    And the more-sporty ways to ride.

A...

Once there, an uphill walk through the shops
    Led to a leaf, rock and root track,
With a stalactite-like mossy falls,
    And a bridge - starting the way back.

A...

Track-side, gripping the ghyll, ancient woods
    Shaded what was a sunny day,
And the babbling-brook gave sound softly -
    Soothing the soul a further way.

A...

Then home - again charmed by the thin-stone
    Minimum-mortar kept buildings,
The surrounds of England’s largest lake,
    And movie train-window viewings.

A...

(C) David Franks 2003
Hear here - http://www.writeoutloud.net/public/blogentry.php?blogentryid=26644

Sunday, 5 September 2010

WALKABOUTSVERSE 160 OF 230

Poem of 160 of 230:  IN MACCLESFIELD'S MULBERRY TREE - SUMMER 2001

After hearing the ways
    Of the old silk-weaving trade,
While being served some tea,
    Within the Mulberry Tree,
Memories came back to me
    Of - during my infant days -
Feeding ‘worms till sheaths were made.

(C) David Franks 2003